2016/08/23

¡Gracias y adiós!

I can't remember why I started this blog - most of my translation work has always been from Dutch, French and German - but I guess it had something to do with the various frustrations of living in Barcelona. However, I now live in London, and Spanish official and corporate gringoisms have improved beyond all recognition, so that the blog may henceforth be presumed dead. Many thanks to all readers and (financial) contributors during however many years have passed, and if you still haven't had enough, then you will find that I continue to do things with languages, including Spanish and Catalan, in my new public life as the Singing Organ-Grinder, followable at http://singingorgangrinder.com and https://twitter.com/elorganillero. x

2016/07/02

Funding the hole in Spain's pension pot left by Rajoy's economic miracle

Maybe it's me, but my impression is that the quality of official EU translation has deteriorated quite sharply in the past few years. But I think we all know, in article 60 of the IORPs Directive, which the Commission is trying to smuggle past national parliaments without discussion or publicity on this busy summer weekend, what a "a Union legal framework" is and what "the Union may adopt measures" will shortly mean for Dutch pensioners in the face of the inevitable Spanish disaster:

(60) Since the objective of the proposed action, namely to create a Union legal framework covering institutions for occupational retirement provision, cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States and can therefore, by reason of the scale and effects of the action, be better achieved by the Union, the Union may adopt measures, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity as set out in Article 5 of the Treaty on European Union. In accordance with the principle of proportionality as set out in that Article, this Directive does not go beyond what is necessary in order to achieve that objective.

There may still be money to be made betting on fiscal transfers as opposed to the collapse of the euro.

2016/07/01

Benidorm: moderately poor translation as a selling point redux

I remember being rather disappointed when, aged 6, one of my first friends in England, the son of refugees from the new Islamism in South Asia, now the old Islamism in Tower Hamlets and Luton and Blackburn, explained to me that there were indeed streets and libraries in Pakistan. I have no idea what happened to BM, but I hope that he too, in this Starbucks world, would appreciate the sense of place and distance created by "THE 8:30 TILL 13:30 H." in the gallery over at El Confidencial.

If the Espanish are mistranslating in order to give us stupid monkeys something to talk about, then I wonder whether we Anglocabrones aren't also acting up for the Occidentalist, sensation-seeking locals:

The first thing an Englishman does on arriving in Benidorm is take off his shirt. Bumping into passersby with naked torsos, reddened by radiation, is commonplace. It doesn't make any difference how close the street is to the beach: taking their shirts off is a symbol of the temporary liberation which they have decided to undergo in a paradise in which the sun shines almost daily, and where one can watch Liverpool or Manchester United on a giant screen, seated on a terrace and with a pint of beer at a price of 1.5 euros.

2016/06/28

"Barcelona Council misappropriated €250 million inheritance using mistranslation of German will"

This blog has speculated over the years that much translation in Spain has been commissioned primarily in order to enrich and/or reputation-launder the clan commissioning it, rather than to benefit the institution involved by delivering words in Furrinese that cost-effectively reflect the original text.

The case of the inheritance of the crony capitalist Julio Muñoz Ramonet (1912-91) is different. Here mistranslation of a detail in his will is said to have been crucial in ensuring that part of his ill-gotten fortune passed into the hands of the City of Barcelona, rather than those of his loathsome daughters.

According to El Confidencial, that detail was the specification that his Spanish loot be held post-mortem "unter dem Patronat der Stadt Barcelona," which means something like "bajo el patrocinio de la ciudad de Barcelona" ("under the patronage of the City of Barcelona") and which confers only obligations, but which the Council conveniently translated as "bajo el patronato de la ciudad de Barcelona" ("under trusteeship of the City of Barcelona") and confers rights as well as obligations (have your sic bag ready):

En alemán, la palabra 'patronat' significa ‘patrocinio’, mientras que el patronato como órgano tiene diferentes nombres: 'Stiftungkuratorium', 'Stiftungvorstand', 'Vorstands', 'Stiftungausschuss' o 'Ausschuss'. Y es importante tener en cuenta que, en castellano, la palabra ‘patronato’ tiene intencionalidad jurídica porque equivale al gobierno de la fundación. En alemán, en cambio, no tiene intencionalidad jurídica porque se refiere a patrocinio o 'esponsorización' y no al gobierno de la institución

Why did it take the heiresses 25 years to bring this up? I don't know, but who can resist a clientelist-on-clientelist war over patronal rights?

2016/06/09

EU interpreter kicked senseless by admin colleague during Commission charity footie match

Politico:

The Schuman Trophy has been a fixture on the Commission’s calendar for 20 years, with teams from each department playing each other and raising money for children’s charities.

But this year’s event — held on May 21 and sponsored by the likes of Volvo and Belgian financial services firm Easyvest — ended in chaos when a player from the Commission’s interpretation department and one from the administration department came to blows. The former ended up in hospital being treated for concussion.

It is said to have started when admin sneered, "You're nothing but a translator!"

2016/06/07

Filho/a da puta

I fear a British employment tribunal is about to give undue weight to an exceptionally everyday Portuguese curse. But José "translator" Mourinho should be able to wriggle his way out of that, and if he can't then he can probably afford it.

2016/05/19

The Royal Spanish Academy: patronising lardy-arsed suits pigging your tax euro?

The local branch of the Canute Society is campaigning against the (incorrect and correct) use of English in advertising:

The RAE "no es una startup." Confirmation in this video.

¡Numancia romana!

Tralala.